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Big Bang theory and the milky way

The combination of milk, paint and soap is like the Disney combo – eternal and magical. This explains why it is the most popular activity in school, art classes and homes.

Last week P and I went on our own trip of the milky way using this combination. Since we were busy doing the experiment, I didn’t get to snap the first burst of colours, hence the borrowed pic

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pic courtesey: stevespangler science

Here’s a list of what you need

Milk

Food colour

Liquid soap

Tooth pick

Method

Pour milk into a shallow bowl and drop different colours. Keep some distance between two colours.

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Dip the end of a toothpick in liquid soap and just touch (not dip) the surface of milk and watch the magic

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The colours burst around the soap almost giving it a ‘Big Bang of Universe’ look

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P loved it to the hilt and kept repeating the experiment till we had muddy milk. We tried it with water too and the effect was same, but the white colour of milk adds an ethereal touch

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Colouring without brushes or crayons

Yes, we did a colouring project without using brushes or crayons or sketch pens.

How? We simply used food colour, water and craft sticks (ice cream sticks). The project also doubled up as a science experiment – capillary action. No, I didn’t tell P the scientific name, else we would have been stuck at the word all day! P has a habit of repeating difficult words till he gets it right.

We started off by dissolving food color in water – red, blue, yellow. I explained to P these are the primary colours from which all other colours originate. Then we took our craft sticks and let P stick one in each of the colours.

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Almost instantly the coloured water started rising up, colouring the stick. When it was half way, we turned the stick and stuck it into a different colour.

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Again instantly the colour began rising. But this time where the two colours met, it mixed and gave a third colour. Red and blue became purple, yellow and blue became green and red and yellow became orange.

P was delighted too see the colour mixing and he kept putting more sticks and trying out other combinations.

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Once the sticks were dry, we made a nice photo frame and put a snap of P. It now stands proudly in his train bookshelf.

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Lava Lamp experiment

We were back to our science experiments and this time I found a cool one called Lava lamp.

This is what it should look like. However, ours was more muddy and shaken, thanks to all the excitement!

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pic courtesy bake,play smile

Anyway, here goes the list of things you will need for the experiment

Old plastic bottle – washed and dried

Oil – I used the cheapest one

Food colour

Water

Pepfizz tablet – the ones you dissolve in water and drink to relieve acidity.Actually any fizzy tablet will do I guess.

Procedure

  1. Pour water into the plastic bottle until it is around 1/4 full
  2. Pour oil until the bottle is nearly full.
  3. Wait until the oil and water have separated. Don’t let your kid touch the bottle as the experiment will flop. You need to get two separate layers

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  1. Add around a dozen drops of food coloring to the bottle. P was only too glad to do this
  2. Watch as the food coloring falls through the oil and mixes with the water.
  3. Break the Pepfizz tablets into small pieces and drop one of them into the bottle,. As the tablet hits the liquid it starts fizzing. AT this point I had a squealing P.
  4. The coloured bubbles start floating and dancing around the bottle just like lava. P was shouting ‘ flying red balls, swimming red balls’  and trying to get his hands into the bottle to touch them

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  1. When the bubbling stops, add another piece of Pepfizz tablet and enjoy the show again!

We had a real riot! P kept shaking the bottle for more bubbles as a result of which they just mixed and became muddy. This is our shaken lava lamp!

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Hope you try it and have a bubbly time just like we did

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Science is fun

Ever since we did the salt and ice science experiment, P has been wanting to do more ‘esspement’. My family will vouch for my just about nodding acquaintance with science, so it was quite a challenge to get all scientific. I reluctantly dived into books and surfed for something that I could do, and more importantly explain to P.

This one literally had me sit up and take notice for it was more artistic and magical than science. I totally recommend you do it for its simplicity yet vibrant result.

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Ingredients for the experiment

Violet cabbage – 1 bowl chopped fine (beetroot will also work)

Lime juice – few drops

Process

Pour boiling water over chopped violet cabbage and let it rest for a few minutes. You can see the water turning beautiful violet almost immediately.

Wait. Do not disturb till the time the colour intensifies.

Once most of the colour is absorbed, strain the cabbage and pour out the coloured liquid in a glass bowl/cup.

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Now drop a few drops of lime juice to the coloured water and see the magic.

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The water turns into a gorgeous shocking pink colour instantly.

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The expression on P’s face as the colour changed was even better than the experiment. He wanted to do more and we ended up repeating the experiment quite a few times.

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Finally we used the coloured water to make lovely pink home made play dough.

I would definetly recommend this little scientific experiment as it will open up curious little minds in more ways than one. I had to battle a list of questions after that from P. Luckily I was prepared for most of them.

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Scientific art or artistic science?

Xmas hols have started and we have a lot of time in hand. So I thought I’ll try some science through art – you know, the basic forms of matter and one form becoming another.

Taking a cue out of my art books, I froze water in bowls, ice tray and mugs to get different shapes. Once the ice was formed I took them out of the moulds. We pretended they were mountains and plateaus and little hillocks.

I then placed them on a plate and sprinkled salt over some of them. To give it an artistic tinge and to make him see how salt slowed the melting I got him to dip a dropper into water colours and drop them on the little mountains and plateaus. The effect was stunning – coloured ridges formed in the salt melted grooves. We went on to drop more colours and saw how the colours mixed and formed a different colour – yellow + blue became green, red and yellow became green.

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P kept rubbing salt on the ice to get more ridges and was squirting away the colours to get absolutely gorgeous efffect on ice.

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Our little science experiment was super fun. What was more fun was seeing the colours trickle down  the ridges and fissures formed by salt creating stunning combination of colours.

I don’t know if P learnt anything about science but he sure learnt colour mixing. By the end he was screaming red and blue gives purple, red and green makes brown!